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Monday, September 26

  1. 3:28 pm
  2. page Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration Act edited By:James Dwyer and Trent Landis Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration Act: also know as the Pit…
    By:James Dwyer and Trent Landis
    Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration Act: also know as the Pittman-Robertson Act
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    3:28 pm
  3. page Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 edited Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 Alex Davis and Cameron Swengel {humpback_whale_sfw.jpg}…

    Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972
    Alex Davis and Cameron Swengel
    {humpback_whale_sfw.jpg}
    Overview:
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    3:27 pm
  4. page Stockholm Conference edited By: Deanna and Jon Declaration of the Conference on the Human Environment of 1972 AKA the Stock…
    By: Deanna and Jon
    Declaration of the Conference on the Human Environment of 1972
    AKA the Stockholm Declaration or First Earth Summit (Adopted June 16, 1972)
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    3:27 pm
  5. page Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act edited Olivia Farish & Brady Lehigh Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 {minmethd.gi…
    Olivia Farish & Brady Lehigh
    Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 {minmethd.gif}
    Draft Year:1977
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    3:27 pm
  6. page The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act edited The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 and 1989 Alex and Kelsey {rcramain.jpg} …

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 and 1989
    Alex and Kelsey
    {rcramain.jpg}
    What does the law do?
    ...
    the nation's
    disposal of solid and hazardous w
    ...
    any violations.
    EPA achieves these goals by inspecting hazardous waste handlers, closely watching hazardous waste activities, and taking legal action when a handler is not cooperative.
    Goals of the RCRA:
    ...
    {fotolia_14797697_XS.jpg}
    Why was the law needed?
    ...
    was created
    to deal with the increasing national waste problem. The nation's problem began after the Industrial Revolution in the late 1800's when the amount of new products and material goods expanded. The problem grew worse after World War II, the nation
    began generating
    500,000 metric tons of hazardous waste per year. The EPA performed a nation survey in 1996 that estimated 279 million metric tons of hazardous waste generated nationwide in 1995.
    1989
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    3:26 pm
  7. page The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 edited Austin Steiner and Hunter Brown The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 was signed into legislation as a l…
    Austin Steiner and Hunter Brown
    The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 was signed into legislation as a law shortly after the Exxon Valdez oil spill. The bill was drafted in August of 1990 and is an amendment to the Clean Water Act. This is a national bill that covers all fifty staes and alaska,including all the waters around the united states of america. The bill was passed mainly due to the 1989 oild spill of the Exxon Valdez, when the oil tanker spilled over 33 million gallons of crude oil after hitting Bligh Reef off the coast of Alaska. The spill occured very close to the city of Prince William Sound, Alaska. Some 1300 miles of coastline and 11,000 square miles of ocean was impacted. As many as 250,000 seabirds, 2,800 sea otters, 12 rivers, 300 harbor seals, 247 bald eagles and 22 orcas were killed as a result of the oil. Billions of salmon and herring eggs were effected, causing a huge lapse in the food chain. During the clean-up efforts high pressure washers were used to clean up the oil off the shoreline. Even after all the clean-up efforts there is still an estimated 26 thousand gallons of crude oil on the shoreline, degrading at less then 4 % a year according to the NOAA.
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    3:26 pm
  8. page Law of the Sea Convention edited Samantha Hartlove Robyn Allen Convention on the Law of the Sea of 1982 (or of the Sea Conventio…
    Samantha Hartlove
    Robyn Allen

    Convention on the Law of the Sea of 1982 (or of the Sea Convention, LOSC):
    This is an international piece of legislation. The law was needed because there were concerns over the territorial divisions of the sea. Also, it was needed due to navigational rights, economical rights, pollution of the seas, preservation of marine life, science explorations, and more. The law keeps other countries within their own territories of the sea. Prior to this law overfishing due to the use of new technology and bigger ships was a concern. Since ships were becoming well equipped to stay out to sea longer and to travel further, fisherman took advantage of this and began to explore outside their previous regions. Also, before the new law, explorations of off-shore resources started to occur. Nations that wanted to protect the newly found local resources started to expand their sea boundaries. The law has so far been successful. An example why it has been successful so far is that we have not run out of fish. The agency responsible for regulation and enforcement is the General Assembly of the United Nations.
    {United-Nations.jpg}
    http://uniosil.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/United-Nations.jpg
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    http://media.economist.com/images/20090516/CFB955.gif
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    3:26 pm
  9. page National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 edited The National Environmental Policy Act By: Patrick and Tessa The National Environmental Policy A…
    The National Environmental Policy Act
    By: Patrick and Tessa
    The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) is a national law that was drafted in 1969. Henry M. Jackson introduced it to the senate on February 18, 1969. President Richard Nixon signed this act into lawon January 1, 1970. Creating the act was a way of promoting the enhancement of the environment. It also established the President’s Council on Environmental Quality.
    {richard-nixon-by-norman-rockwell.jpg}
    ...
    Work cited:
    “Freeway and expressway revolts - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia." Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Feb. 2011. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freeway_revolt>.
    ...
    2011. <http://www.epa.gov/compliance/nepa/>.
    "National

    "National
    Environmental Policy
    ...
    2011. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Environmental_Policy_Act>.
    analysts,

    analysts,
    introduces new
    ...
    2011. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Environmental>
    
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    3:25 pm
  10. page Convention of Ozone Depletion and the Montreal Protocol of 1986 edited Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer By Courtney Frey & Danni Reach…

    Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer
    By Courtney Frey & Danni Reachard
    What is it?
    The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer was first drafted in 1985. It was then called the Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer. This only asked for cooperation in research; it didn't limit CFC's in any way. In 1986, amendments were made that limited CFC's. The name was then changed to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer. The treaty added gradual phase down of CFC production in 1987. Many more amendments were made to strengthen the treaty in the 1990's: London (1990), Copenhagen (1992), Vienna (1995), Montreal (1997), and Beijing (1999). This treaty became one of the first international environmental agreements.
    Why was it needed?
    ...
    ozone layer.
    Chemists at the University of California began studying the affects of CFC's in the atmosphere. They found that they remained in the atmosphere for a long time because they were stable enough to remain there for 50-100 years, before being broken down by ultraviolet radiation. Once these substances were broken down, they released a chlorine atom. These chlorine atoms were thought to be the cause of the ozone depletion.
    The chart on the right shows the different things that were depleting the ozone layer. They were all rising dramatically from about 1965 until 1992. CFC's (in yellow) contributed a lot to this increase. The red dashed line shows what would have happened if there was no Protocol put in place. The green dashed line shows what is predicted to happen in the future with the Montreal Protocol put in place.
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    3:25 pm

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